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hydraulic crimp hands down, a soldered connection will NEVER be as good as a cold weld. solder is metal glue basically, the conductivity is very low. for high current/voltage applications crimping is the industry standard (military, transmission lines, power plants...etc)
 

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Bench vice, works like a charm.

There are crimping tools for 0/1 that are manual, but are bulky and similar to bolt cutters. Out in the field there is no hydraulic for technicians. lol
 

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what are you smoking...? how the hell do you think utility companies make connections at power plants/substations/transmission lines

lineman/utility workers use these

or these

or these



bench vises typically are 5tons clamping force or less, that is if you don't strip the threading trying to achieve that over and over
 

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My guy works for AT&T and uses the second one in decafs post.
Also my dad was an electrician for 20 odd years and says that solder isn't meant for that high voltage. I always just hammer my lugs on.
 
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what are you smoking...? how the hell do you think utility companies make connections at power plants/substations/transmission lines

lineman/utility workers use these

or these

or these



bench vises typically are 5tons clamping force or less, that is if you don't strip the threading trying to achieve that over and over
We used another crimp out in the field. It pushes a pin into it. Hard to explain but out in the residential electric world there isn't to many hydro crimps but I wish there was lol
 

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We used another crimp out in the field. It pushes a pin into it. Hard to explain but out in the residential electric world there isn't to many hydro crimps but I wish there was lol
like these?


I have a similar crimper for 8g and smaller wiring



i was eluding to larger scale connections than residential, power lines/power plants and the like
 

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Yes, what vince79vette posted is what is used in the field for us.

We install low voltage twisted pair wire for networking. Also fiber. We use a crimper like said above for the 6 gauge grounding lugs for the network cabinets and to ground metal cable tray. It is not used all that much so there is no way to justify the expense of the automated crimps.

And you do not need 5 tons of force in CA to make a good crimp. A bench vise with a little muscle is all you need.
 

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Yes, what vince79vette posted is what is used in the field for us.

We install low voltage twisted pair wire for networking. Also fiber. We use a crimper like said above for the 6 gauge grounding lugs for the network cabinets and to ground metal cable tray. It is not used all that much so there is no way to justify the expense of the automated crimps.

And you do not need 5 tons of force in CA to make a good crimp. A bench vise with a little muscle is all you need.
Read what you just wrote... you used the correct tool for the job. That's all I'm suggesting, the tool was designed for large gauge wire to be connected properly to a lug, simple.

Nissan wouldn't let their employees use a bench vise on the Leaf's batteries would they? No.
 

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I am not sure but I know they must be a lot cheaper than the hydro version because the company I worked for was cheap asses. We have use a very big pair of vise grips before to do it to just not as easy. Is say if it works for u do it. I know some battery shops will crimp them for free for u if u bring your wire an crimps
 

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So I told everyone to use Rosin Core solder years ago. I would used closed end 100% Copper Terminals and was soldering them at that stage in my career. At that time I was an installer at a small mom and pop place in Colorado Springs. The fact that I was soldering all of my Terminals impressed the owner, Haha but we both didn't know anything about it other than how to perform the act. Yes HarrisonDesigns is correct. Rosin Core is for plumbing and Silver is for Electrical. I learned that a few years after while I was working for Car Toys. So yes if you are going to solder your Terminals Do not use Rosin Core always use Silver Solder. Anyways later on I just spent the money to get a high end pneumatic crimper and stayed with closed end 100 % copper terminals. You could place them on a hook and hang your body weight from them while tugging and they wouldn't come apart. That in my opinion is the best way to connect your terminals. In fact if I had just bought the nice crimper I would've saved a ton of money. Solder nor Flux is cheap. Not to mention all of the money on butane. A good pneumatic crimper is about $250-$300.
 
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